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  1. […] Collective Intelligence was a visionary work in at least as many ways as it was a profoundly controversial and frequently misunderstood one. Written before the rise of contemporary social networks, it called for new technologies to “engineer the social bond” and highlighted a crisis of identities. Written before the creation of Wikipedia, it envisioned that cyberspace would enable the creation of a “cosmopedia” (of which Wikipedia is undeniably a seed).Lévy’s vision of the utopian cyberspace as an improvised choreography of “angels” (p. 91—115) may challenge the irreligious sensibilities of some contemporary readers, but let us not forget that what he put forward is a fundamentally atheistic and humanistic project. If we substitute “avatars”, being the currently fashionable word to refer to virtual identities, for “angels”, his theses may appear more plausible… serendipitously, “avatar” etymologically originates from the Sanskrit ava-tāra, meaning “descent of a deity”.  […]

  2. RAKOTOAMBININA

    I actually work on Disaster Risk Management. Recently I discovered this Collective Intelligence is so relevant in our field! Nevertheless, how could we resolve technologic gaps in developing countries?

    • The digital divide will doubtless be a major challenge of this century. There is no panacea, only a patchwork of partial solutions that can only actually work when they are all present at once. At the risk of grossly oversimplifying…

      • An open dialogue about the issue must be established between government and citizens; the digital divide must be apprehended as a political problem, in the broadest sense of the term.
      • Proper communication infrastructures must be implemented — by government or any other organization — in such a way that as many people as possible can freely use them.
      • Education must come to integrate digital literacy: navigating the virtual realms may well become the single most crucial skill to be mastered in this day and age.
  3. […] Human intelligence? Its space is dispersion. Its time, the eclipse. Its knowledge, the fragment. Collective intelligence realizes its reintegration. It constructs transpersonal but continuous thought. An anonymous cogitation but one that is perpetually alive, uniformly irrigated, metamorphic. Through the intermediary of virtual worlds, we can not only exchange information but think together, share our memories and our plans to produce a cooperative brain. […]

  4. […] One word: Fascinating! (Nod to Mr. Spock) Click to enlarge the chart.Nuggets from the book summary of Collective Intelligence by Pierre Lévy: The premise: Humankind must acknowledge the potential of cyberspace to enable beneficial new forms of complex collective thought, collective expression, and social organization. Technology makes this feasible (p. 246). The author's ideas are reminiscent of:Vannevar Bush‘s collective memoryMarshall McLuhan‘s notion of a forthcoming “global village”Douglas Engelbart‘s vision of the computer as a tool to augment human thought,J. C. R. Licklider‘s plans for symbiotic human—computer networks. Lévy calls for a revolution in society’s understanding of itself – the expansion of subjectivity (cf. Lévy, 2000). Features:Multi-modal and dynamic (p. 120)Virtual worlds instruments of self-knowledge and self-definition Deterritorialized with self-organizationContinuous self-invention of human communitiesComputer-aided imagination The collective can choose to foster & encourage individuality  […]

  5. […] Fascinating nuggets from the book summary of Collective Intelligence by Pierre Lévy (click through post here to locate & enlarge the chart): The premise: Humankind must acknowledge the potential of cyberspace to enable beneficial new forms of complex collective thought, collective expression, and social organization. Technology makes this feasible (p. 246). The author's ideas are reminiscent of:Vannevar Bush‘s collective memoryMarshall McLuhan‘s notion of a forthcoming “global village”Douglas Engelbart‘s vision of the computer as a tool to augment human thought,J. C. R. Licklider‘s plans for symbiotic human—computer networks. Lévy calls for a revolution in society’s understanding of itself – the expansion of subjectivity (cf. Lévy, 2000). Features:Multi-modal and dynamic (p. 120)Virtual worlds instruments of self-knowledge and self-definition Deterritorialized with self-organizationContinuous self-invention of human communitiesComputer-aided imagination The collective can choose to foster & encourage individuality From another reviewer: Levy begins with the premise that the prosperity of any nation or other entity depends on their ability to navigate the knowledge space, and … knowledge space will displace the spaces of the (natural) earth, (political) territory, or (economic) commodity.  […]

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